U.S. Other Information

  • Credits
  • Transfers
  • Academic Year
  • Grading System
  • Classroom Environment

U.S. Other Information | Details

Credits

Each course is worth a certain number of credits or credit hours. This number is roughly the same as the number of hours a student spends in class for that course each week. A course is typically worth three to five credits.

A full-time program at most schools is 12 or 15 credit hours (four or five courses per term) and a certain number of credits must be fulfilled in order to graduate. International students are expected to enroll in a full-time program during each term

Transfers

If a student enrolls at a new university before finishing a degree, generally most credits earned at the first school can be used to complete a degree at the new university. This means a student can transfer to another university and still graduate within a reasonable time.

Academic Year

The academic calendar usually begins in August or September and continues through May or June. The majority of new students begin in Autumn, so it is a good idea for international students to also begin their US university studies at this time. There is a lot of excitement at the beginning of the school year and students form many great friendships during this time, as they are all adjusting to a new phase of academic life. Additionally, many courses are designed for students to take them in sequence, starting in Autumn and continuing through the year.

The academic year at many schools is composed of two terms called “semesters.” (Some schools use a three-term calendar known as the “trimester” system.) Still, others further divide the year into the quarter system of four terms, including an optional Summer session. Basically, if you exclude the Summer session, the academic year is either comprised of two semesters or three quarter terms.

(This excerpt was taken from IDP International Education Specialists. Follow this link (https://www.idp.com/usa/forstudents/whystudyintheus/education-system) to go into their website and check out the article)

Source: © 2016 Study in the USA. All Rights Reserved

Grading System

Just like American students, you will have to submit your academic transcripts as part of your application for admission to university or college. Academic transcripts are official copies of your academic work. In the US this includes your “grades” and “grade point average” (GPA), which are measurements of your academic achievement. Courses are commonly graded using percentages, which are converted into letter grades.

The grading system and GPA in the US can be confusing, especially for international students. The interpretation of grades has a lot of variation. For example, two students who attended different schools both submit their transcripts to the same university. They both have 3.5 GPAs, but one student attended an average high school, while the other attended a prestigious school that was academically challenging. The university might interpret their GPAs differently because the two schools have dramatically different standards.

Therefore, there are some crucial things to keep in mind:

  • You should find out the US equivalent of the last level of education you completed in your home country.
  • Pay close attention to the admissions requirements of each university and college, as well as individual degree programs, which may have different requirements than the university.
  • Regularly meet with your IDP counselor to make sure you are meeting the requirements.

Your IDP counselor will be able to advise you on whether or not you must spend an extra year or two preparing for US university admission. If an international student enters a US university or college prior to being eligible to attend university in their own country, some countries’ governments and employers may not recognize the students’ US education.

Classroom Environment

Classes range from large lectures with several hundred students to smaller classes and seminars (discussion classes) with only a few students. The American university classroom atmosphere is very dynamic. You will be expected to share your opinion, argue your point, participate in class discussions, and give presentations. International students find this one of the most surprising aspects of the American education system.

Each week professors usually assign textbook and other readings. You will be expected to keep up-to-date with the required readings and homework so you can participate in class discussions and understand the lectures. Certain degree programs also require students to spend time in the laboratory.

Professors issue grades for each student enrolled in the course. Grades are usually based upon:

  • Each professor will have a unique set of class participation requirements, but students are expected to participate in class discussions, especially in seminar classes. This is often a very important factor in determining a student’s grade.
  • midterm examination is usually given during class time.
  • One or more research or term papers, or laboratory reports must be submitted for evaluation.
  • Possible short exams or quizzes are given. Sometimes professors will give an unannounced “pop quiz.” This doesn’t count heavily toward the grade, but is intended to inspire students to keep up with their assignments and attendance.
  • A final examination will be held after the final class meeting.

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